Boyle Heights Beat archive. Photo by Jonathan Olivares.
Boyle Heights Beat archive. Photo by Jonathan Olivares.
Boyle Heights Beat archive. Photo by Jonathan Olivares.

Tight races and controversial measures fill the ballot Tuesday when Los Angeles voters decide on City Council, school board and community college district board members. Voters will also choose whether to change the date of local elections in an attempt to boost low voter participation.

Below is a voter guide to help Boyle Heights residents on their way to the precincts for the March 3 primary elections. View your sample ballot here.

MEMBER OF THE LOS ANGELES CITY COUNCIL, District 14 (Vote for One)

Candidates have been squaring off in forums around the area in one of the most hotly contested races in the city. The member seat covers Boyle Heights, Downtown L.A., Eagle Rock, El Sereno, Garvanza, Glassell Park, Lincoln Heights and Monterey Hills. Big issues for Boyle Heights residents include gentrification and development, affordable housing, as well as city services.

Hear four of the five candidates share their top priorities if elected during Boyle Heights Beat’s Feb. 7 candidate forum and read more about why they want to serve this district. (If none of the candidates gets a majority of votes, the top two candidates will continue to a runoff on May 19 as part of the general municipal election.)

  • Nadine Momoyo Diaz
    Social Worker/Researcher
  • Jose Huizar
    Los Angeles City Councilmember
  • John O’Neill
    Community Political Consultant
  • Mario Chavez
    Activist/Union Organizer
  • Gloria Molina
    LA County Supervisor

LOS ANGELES COMMUNITY COLLEGE DISTRICT BOARD OF TRUSTEES:

The trustees control a $3 billion budget and oversee policies that affect 136,000 students. In this March primary election, the candidate who gets the largest number of votes wins, even if it is less than 50 percent.

  • Member of the Board of Trustees, Seat 1 (Vote for One)
    Andra Hoffman, Community College Professor
    Maria “Sokie” Quintero, Community College Professor
    Mark Isler, Teacher, Radio Host
    Francesca Vega, College Policy Director
  • Member of the Board of Trustees, Seat 3 (Vote for One)
    Jozef “Joe” Thomas Essavi, Los Angeles County Commissioner/Businessperson
    Sydney Kamlager, Education Policy Advisor
    Sam Kbushyan, College Instructor
    Glenn Bailey, Neighborhood Council Boardmember
  • Member of the Board of Trustees, Seat 5 (Vote for One)
    Steve Schulte, Environmental Science Instructor
    Scott Svonkin, Community College Boardmember
  • Member of the Board of Trustees, Seat 7 (Vote for One)
    Mike Fong, Educator/Job Trainer
    Joyce Burrell Garcia, Educator
    John C. Burke, Community College Faculty

CITY OF LOS ANGELES MEASURES: Charter Amendments 1 and 2:

Both measures are meant to boost low voter participation by combining local elections with higher turnout presidential and gubernatorial elections.

If the Charter Amendments pass, this year’s city and school board candidates will serve 5  ½ years in office, rather than the standard 4-year term. Opponents say it could make election races more expensive and give an advantage to incumbents and those backed by special interests.

  • Measure 1: New City Election Dates and Schedules (Vote Yes or No)

Voters will choose whether to change City’s primary and general election dates to June and November of even-numbered years beginning in 2020. This is so City elections will be held on the same dates as Federal and State elections.

  • Measure 2: New Election Dates and Schedules for LAUSD (Vote Yes or No)

Voters will choose whether to change the LAUSD Board of Education’s primary and general election to June and November of even numbered years beginning in 2020. This is so LAUSD elections are held on the same dates as Federal and State elections.

Polls open at 7:00 a.m. and close at 8:00 p.m. on Tuesday, March 3. To find your polling place call (888) 873-1000 or visit lavote.net/locator.

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